Entries by MARK BROWNING

Idaho Barn Owls

Barn Owls in Idaho As our range map shows, barn owl populations in the southern half of Idaho are excellent from the agricultural valleys to the high desert scrublands; the northern half is too heavily forested for barn owls except for certain lower altitude valleys in the west. Biologist Bruce Haak of the Idaho Department of […]

Wisconsin Barn Owls

Barn Owls in Wisconsin The barn owl in Wisconsin is rare and listed as endangered. Most breeding records have come from the southern counties where the state Bureau of Endangered Resources has attempted to bolster barn owl populations over the years by installing over one hundred nest boxes and releasing captive bred owls. The Wisconsin […]

Connecticut Barn Owls

Barn Owls in Connecticut Barn owls have always been uncommon to rare in Connecticut due to the state’s harsh winters. They are principally found along the coast and within the large river valleys of the state. Breeding has been confirmed in coastal areas and near Middletown, 30 miles in from the coast, where there is […]

Tennessee Barn Owls

Barn Owls in Tennessee The western third of the state, with its low-country riverine and wetland systems, provides excellent habitat; and hay production in a wide band in the eastern third also produces good numbers. The middle of the state, though high in hay production, does not receive as many reports of barn owls as […]

Indiana Barn Owls

  As in many northern states, in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, when the original forest cover was cut in Indiana to create land for farming, the barn owl thrived. Since then, much of Indiana’s forests have regenerated and farming has moved from hay and cattle to soy and corn. These and other […]

Iowa Barn Owls

Barn Owls in Iowa Iowa once had far more barn owls than it does today, though the numbers in Iowa were never very high due to the normally severe winters. The main problem for barn owls is not so much cold as it is deep snow. When a heavy snow remains on the ground for […]

Wisconsin Barn Owls

Barn Owls in Wisconsin The barn owl in Wisconsin is rare and listed as endangered. Most breeding records have come from the southern counties where the state Bureau of Endangered Resources has attempted to bolster barn owl populations over the years by installing over one hundred nest boxes and releasing captive bred owls. The Wisconsin […]

West Virginia Barn Owls

Barn Owls in West Virginia This small, mountainous state, with its extensive forests, provides intermittent, yet excellent habitat for barn owls in its narrow valleys of pasture and hay that spread like numerous fingers between the hillsides. The saving grace of West Virginia farmland is that the steep hills do not afford the chance to […]

Delaware Barn Owls

Barn Owls in Delaware Delaware is a perfect example of how each state seems to have its own dynamic in terms of barn owl populations. Biologist Wayne Lehman, Division of Fish and Wildlife, reports that barn owls are found primarily along the coastal salt marshes where their numbers are excellent. He attributes nest boxes to […]

Arkansas Barn Owls

Barn Owls in Arkansas Barn owls breed throughout Arkansas. They are most common in the wet agricultural regions of the Mississippi delta in the eastern third of the state. Arkansas grows more rice than any other state in the nation, primarily in the eastern third. Not only is rice good for ducks, it is also […]

Arizona Barn Owls

Barn Owls in Arizona Common in the entire state, save the northwestern counties of Cococino, Navajo, and Apache, and northern Gila and Greenlee Counties. The high mountains that run in a sharp arc from northern Cococino County down through Navaho, Apache, and Greenlee Counties roughly divide the rather poor populations of the northeastern third of […]

Alabama Barn Owls

Barn Owls in Alabama Barn owl populations are excellent throughout the state. With high hay and cattle production in most counties, and salt-water marshes along the coast, barn owls are afforded excellent habitat. Hay and wheat fields are common, with heavy concentrations in the north and the southeast portions of the state. As open field […]